Alligators

Alligators

An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae, there are two living alligator species: the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis). Alligators first appeared during the Oligocene epoch about 37 million years ago, and can weigh from 800 to over 1000 lbs, with a length of up to 14.5 ft.

About Alligators

An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. There are two living alligator species: the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis). In addition, several extinct species of alligator are known from fossil remains. Alligators first appeared during the Oligocene epoch about 37 million years ago. The name alligator is an anglicized form of el lagarto, the Spanish term for 'lizard', which early Spanish explorers and settlers in Florida called the alligator. A large adult American alligator's weight and length is 800 pounds (360 kg) and 13 feet (4.0 m) long, but can grow to 14.5 feet (4.4 m) long and weigh over 1,000 pounds (450 kg). The largest ever recorded was found in Louisiana and measured 19 feet 2 inches (5.84 m). The Chinese alligator is smaller, rarely exceeding 7 feet (2.1 m) in length. Alligators have an average of 75 teeth.

Contributions by Sengkang, Postdlf, and Dawson.