American Bison

American Bison

The American Bison, or buffalo, is an animal that once roamed the prairies in high numbers in the 19 century, but became nearly extinct when the government ordered them killed in an effort to control the Indian populations.

About American Bison

The American bison (Bison bison), also commonly known as the American buffalo, is a North American species of bison that once roamed the grasslands of North America in massive herds, became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle, and has made a recent resurgence largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves. Their historical range roughly comprised a triangle between the Great Bear Lake in Canada's far northwest, south to the Mexican states of Durango and Nuevo Len, and east along the western boundary of the Appalachian Mountains. Two subspecies or ecotypes have been described: the plains bison (Bison bison bison), smaller in size and with a more rounded hump, and the wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) the larger of the two and having a taller, square hump.

Contributions by Haiduc, Khoikhoi, and Neutrality.