Anglo-Normans

Anglo-Normans

The Normans were people who got their name from Normandy, a region in northern France. They were descendents of the orse Vikings.

About Anglo-Normans

The Normans or north men (in French: Normands; in German: Nordmanner) were the people who gave their name to Normandy, a region in northern France. They were descended from Norse Viking conquerors of the territory and the native population of Frankish and Gallo-Roman stock. Their identity emerged initially in the first half of the 10th century, and gradually evolved over succeeding centuries. They played a major political, military, and cultural role in medieval Europe and even the Near East. They were famed for their martial spirit and eventually for their Christian piety. They quickly adopted the Romance language of the land they settled, their dialect becoming known as Norman or Norman-French, an important literary language. The Duchy of Normandy, which they formed by treaty with the French crown, was one of the great fiefs of medieval France.

Contributions by Srnec, Vernon Nero De Stafford, and Wiglaf.