Boolean Logic

Boolean Logic

Boolean algebra, as developed in 1854 by George Boole in his book An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, is a variant of ordinary elementary algebra differing in its values, operations, and laws. Instead of the usual algebra of numbers, Boolean algebra is the algebra of truth values 0 and 1.

About Boolean Logic

Boolean algebra, as developed in 1854 by George Boole in his book An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, is a variant of ordinary elementary algebra differing in its values, operations, and laws. Instead of the usual algebra of numbers, Boolean algebra is the algebra of truth values 0 and 1, or equivalently of subsets of a given set. The operations are usually taken to be conjunction _, disjunction _, and negation _, with constants 0 and 1. And the laws are definable as those equations that hold for all values of their variables, for example x_(y_x) = x. Applications include mathematical logic, digital logic, computer programming, set theory, and statistics.. According to Huntington the moniker "Boolean algebra" was first suggested by Sheffer in 1913. Boole's algebra predated the modern developments in abstract algebra and mathematical logic; it is however seen as connected to the origins of both fields.

Contributions by Tijfo098, Vaughan Pratt, and D.Lazard.