Boredom

Boredom

Boredom is when a person feels as though there is nothing to do or interesting going on around them. Boredom can be a sign of depression or the person could simply find a subject uninteresting. "Boredom is just the reverse side of fascination: both depend on being outside rather than inside a situation, and one leads to the other."- Arthur Schopenhauer.

About Boredom

Boredom is an emotional state experienced when an individual is left without anything in particular to do, and is not interested in their surroundings. The first recorded use of the word boredom is in the novel Bleak House by Charles Dickens, written in 1852, in which it appears six times, although the expression to be a bore had been used in the sense of to be tiresome or dull since 1768. The French term for boredom, ennui, is sometimes used in English as well. Boredom has been defined by C. D. Fisher in terms of its central psychological processes: _an unpleasant, transient affective state in which the individual feels a pervasive lack of interest in and difficulty concentrating on the current activity._ M. R. Leary and others describe boredom as _an affective experience associated with cognitive attentional processes. In positive psychology, boredom is described as a response to a moderate challenge for which the subject has more than enough skill. There are three types of boredom, all of which involve problems of engagement of attention. These include times when we are prevented from engaging in wanted activity, when we are forced to engage in unwanted activity, or when we are simply unable, for no apparent reason, to maintain engagement in any activity or spectacle.

Contributions by Mr. Billion, Tawkerbot2, and 203.10.121.82.