Brazilian Food

Brazilian Food

Brazilian food is a very distinct way of cooking, and similar to its surrounding neighbors. Brazilian pine nuts grow in abundance and a very popular snack.

About Brazilian Food

Brazilian cooking, while it has many similarities with that of its South American neighbors, is distinct. Stretching from the Amazon in the north, through the fertile plantations of the central coast and on to the southern pampas, the food of Brazil spans a unique mix of cultures and cuisines. The original population contributed popular ingredients like [cassava] and guarana. African slaves influenced the cuisine of the coastal states, especially Bahia. And around the country, a Portuguese heritage is reflected in a variety of dishes. Root vegetables such as cassava (locally known as mandioca, aipim, or macaxeira), yams, and peanuts, and fruit like acai, cupuacu, mango, papaya, guava, orange, passionfruit, pineapple, and hog plum are among the local ingredients used in cooking. Brazilian pine nuts (pinhao) grow in a tree (Araucaria angustifolia) that is abundant in the southern part of Brazil, and are a popular national snack, as well as a lucrative export.

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