Celery (plant)

Celery (plant)

About Celery (plant)

Apium graveolens is a plant species in the family Apiaceae commonly known as celery or celeriac, depending on whether the petioles (stalks) or roots are eaten: celery refers to the former and celeriac to the latter. Apium graveolens grows to 1 m tall. The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate leaves with rhombic leaflets 36 cm long and 24 cm broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 23 mm diameter, produced in dense compound umbels. The seeds are broad ovoid to globose, 1.52 mm long and wide. First attested in English 1664, the word 'celery' derives from the French cleri, in turn from Italian seleri, the plural of selero, which comes from Late Latin selinon, the latinisation of the Greek, 'parsley'. The earliest attested form of the word is the Mycenaean Greek se-ri-no, written in Linear B syllabic script. Celery was described by Carl von Linn in Volume One of his Species Plantarum in 1753.