Cheyenne People

Cheyenne People

About Cheyenne People

Cheyenne are an indigenous people of the Great Plains, who are of the Algonquian language family. The Cheyenne Nation is composed of two united tribes, the So'taeo'o (more commonly spelled as Suhtai or Sutaio) and the Tsetsehestahese (more commonly spelled as Tsitsistas). Today Cheyenne people are enrolled in two federally recognized tribes, the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Oklahoma and the Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in Montana. The Cheyenne are thought to have branched off other tribes of Algonquian stock inhabiting lands around the Great Lakes in present-day Minnesota, perhaps ca. 1500. In historic times they moved west, migrating across the Mississippi River and into North and South Dakota. During the early 19th century, the Cheyenne formed a unified tribe, with more centralized authority through ritual ceremonies and structure than other Plains Indians.

Contributions by 69.144.82.75, 158.165.143.150, and AntiVandalBot.