Chlamydia trachomatis

Chlamydia trachomatis

About Chlamydia trachomatis

Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is one of three bacterial species in the genus Chlamydia. C. trachomatis is a Gram-negative bacteria, therefore its cell wall components retain the counter-stain safranin and appear pink under a light microscope. The inclusion bodies of Chlamydia trachomatis were first described in 1942, the Chlamydia trachomatis agent was first cultured in the yolk sacs of eggs by Feifan Tang et al in 1957. Chlamydial infection. Advances in the diagnostic isolation of Chlamydia, including TRIC agent, from the eye, genital tract, and rectum. C. trachomatis includes three human biovars: Many, but not all, C. trachomatis strains have an extrachromosomal plasmid. In a study released on March 12, 2012 in Nature Genetics, researchers have found that Chlamydia has evolved more actively than was previously thought.

Contributions by 216.82.165.82, MarcoTolo, and Karin D. E. Everett.