Cicadas

Cicadas

A cicada is an insect with large eyes on the head, that are spaced wide apart, are usually transparent, with well-veined wings. Cicadas are related to leafhoppers and spittlebugs, and come out to mate, once, every 17 years.

About Cicadas

A cicada is an insect of the order Hemiptera, suborder Auchenorrhyncha (which was formerly included in the now invalid suborder Homoptera), in the superfamily Cicadoidea, with large eyes wide apart on the head and usually transparent, well-veined wings. There are about 2,500 species of cicada around the world, and many of them remain unclassified. Cicadas live in temperate to tropical climates where they are among the most widely recognized of all insects, mainly due to their large size and unique sound. Cicadas are often colloquially called locusts, although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are a kind of grasshopper. Cicadas are related to leafhoppers and spittlebugs. Cicadas are benign to humans under normal circumstances and do not bite or sting in a true sense, but may mistake a person's arm or other part of their body for a tree or plant limb and attempt to feed.

Contributions by B9 hummingbird hovering, Lupo, and DanielCD.