Classical Conditioning

Classical Conditioning

Classical conditioning is a form of learning in which one stimulus, the conditioned stimulus or CS, comes to signal the occurrence of a second stimulus.

About Classical Conditioning

Classical conditioning (also Pavlovian conditioning or respondent conditioning) is a form of learning in which one stimulus, the conditioned stimulus or CS, comes to signal the occurrence of a second stimulus, the unconditioned stimulus or US. The US is usually a biologically significant stimulus such as food or pain that elicits a response from the start; this is called the unconditioned response or UR. The CS usually produces no particular response at first, but after conditioning it elicits the conditioned response or CR. Classical conditioning differs from operant or instrumental conditioning, in which behavior emitted by the organism is strengthened or weakened by its consequences (e.g. reward or punishment). Conditioning is usually done by pairing the two stimuli, as in Pavlovs classic experiments. Pavlov presented dogs with a ringing bell (CS) followed by food (US).

Contributions by Kpmiyapuram, Lova Falk, and 211.28.215.68.