Coffeetrees

Coffeetrees

About Coffeetrees

The Kentucky Coffeetree, Gymnocladus dioicus, is a tree in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae of the pea family Fabaceae, native to the midwest of North America. The seed may be used as a substitute for coffee beans, however, it is toxic in large quantities. The wood from the tree is used by cabinetmakers and carpenters. The tree's range is limited, occurring from Southern Ontario, Canada and in the United States from Kentucky (where it was first encountered by Europeans) and western Pennsylvania in the east, to Kansas, eastern Nebraska, and southeastern South Dakota in the west, to southern Wisconsin and Michigan in the north, and to northern Louisiana in the south. From 1976 to 1994 it was the state tree of Kentucky, after which the tulip poplar (actually a member of the magnolia family) was returned to that designation. Varies from 18 to 21 meters (6070feet) high with a spread of 1215 meters (4050feet) and a trunk up to one meter (3feet) in diameter.