Connectivity

Connectivity

About Connectivity

In mathematics and computer science, connectivity is one of the basic concepts of graph theory: it asks for the minimum number of elements (nodes or edges) which need to be removed to disconnect the remaining nodes from each other. It is closely related to the theory of network flow problems. The connectivity of a graph is an important measure of its robustness as a network. In an undirected graph G, two vertices u and v are called connected if G contains a path from u to v. Otherwise, they are called disconnected. If the two vertices are additionally connected by a path of length 1, i.e. by a single edge, the vertices are called adjacent. A graph is said to be connected if every pair of vertices in the graph is connected. A connected component is a maximal connected subgraph of G. Each vertex belongs to exactly one connected component, as does each edge.

Contributions by Radagast3, MathMartin, and David Eppstein.