Drywall

Drywall

About Drywall

Drywall (also known as plasterboard, wallboard or gypsum board) is a panel made of gypsum plaster pressed between two thick sheets of paper. It is used to make interior walls and ceilings. It is also an excellent quick DIY repair tool. Drywall construction became prevalent as a speedier alternative to traditional lath and plaster. In many places, the common term is a genericized trademark such as gib, sheetrock or gyproc. The first plasterboard plant in the UK was opened in 1888 in Rochester Kent. Sackett Board was invented in 1894 by Augustine Sackett and Fred Kane. It was made by layering plaster within four plies of wool felt paper. Sheets were 36' 36' 1/4' thick with open (untaped) edges.' Gypsum Board evolved between 1910 and 1930 beginning with wrapped board edges, and elimination of the two inner layers of felt paper in favor of paper-based facings. Providing efficiency of installation, it was developed additionally as a measure of fire resistance.

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