Dynamite

Dynamite

About Dynamite

Dynamite is an explosive material based on nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth, or another absorbent substance such as powdered shells, clay, sawdust, or wood pulp. Dynamites using organic materials such as sawdust are less stable and such use has been generally discontinued. Dynamite was invented by the Swedish chemist and engineer Alfred Nobel in Krummel (Geesthacht, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany), and patented in 1867. Its name is derived from Greek roots dynamis dynamis that literally mean "connected with power." Dynamite is usually sold in the form of sticks about 8_in (20_cm) long and about 1.25_in (3.2_cm) in diameter, with a weight of about 0.5_lb (0.23_kg). Other sizes also exist. The maximum shelf life of nitroglycerin-based dynamite is recommended as one year from the date of manufacture under good storage conditions. Dynamite is a high explosive, which means it detonates rather than deflagrates.

Contributions by 205.222.248.168, Captainbeefart, and USPatent.