Erwin Schrodinger

Erwin Schrodinger

About Erwin Schrodinger

Erwin Rudolf Josef Alexander Schrodinger (August 12, 1887 - January 4,1961) was an Austrian born physicist and theoretical biologist who was one of the fathers of quantum mechanics, and is famed for a number of important contributions to physics, especially the Schrodinger equation, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1933. In 1935 he proposed the Schrodinger's cat thought experiment. In 1887 Schrodinger was born in Vienna, Austria to Rudolf Schrodinger (cerecloth producer, botanist) and Georgine Emilia Brenda (daughter of Alexander Bauer, Professor of Chemistry, Technische Hochschule Vienna). His mother was half Austrian and half English; his father was Catholic and his mother was Lutheran. Despite having a religious background, he was later said to be an atheist. In 1898 he attended the Akademisches Gymnasium. Between 1906 and 1910 Schrodinger studied in Vienna under Franz Serafin Exner (1849-1926) and Friedrich Hasenohrl (1874-1915). He also conducted experimental work with Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Fritz Kohlrausch 1884-1953. In 1911 Schrodinger became an assistant to Exner. At an early age, Schrodinger was strongly Schrödinger was strongly influenced by Arthur Schopenhauer. As a result of his extensive reading of Schopenhauer's works, he became deeply interested throughout his life in color theory and philosophy.

Contributions by Casey Abell, Pfalstad, and DonSiano.