Freddie Mercury

Freddie Mercury

He made stomping your feet and clapping at sporting events trendy and is responsible for the most iconic scene from the Wayne's World films, but Freddie Mercury's true claim to fame is as the front man for British rock group Queen. Mercury (then Farrokh Bulsara) grew up in Zanzibar and India until he was 17, when he and his family moved to England. In 1970, Mercury and members of the band Smile joined forces and renamed the band Queen. Mercury was an acknowledged bisexual, with long-term relationships with both men and women. In 1992, Mercury died from bronchial pneumonia resulting from AIDS.

About Freddie Mercury

Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara (Gujarati: ); 5 September 1946 24 November 1991) was a British musician, singer and songwriter, best known as the lead vocalist and lyricist of the rock band Queen. As a performer, he was known for his flamboyant stage persona and powerful vocals over a four-octave range. As a songwriter, Mercury composed many hits for Queen, including 'Bohemian Rhapsody', 'Killer Queen', 'Somebody to Love', 'Don't Stop Me Now', 'Crazy Little Thing Called Love' and 'We Are the Champions'. In addition to his work with Queen, he led a solo career, and also occasionally served as a producer and guest musician (piano or vocals) for other artists. He died of bronchopneumonia brought on by AIDS on 24 November 1991, only one day after publicly acknowledging he had the disease. Mercury was a Parsi born in Zanzibar and grew up there and in India until his mid-teens. He has been referred to as 'Britain's first Asian rock star'.

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