Gas Stations

Gas Stations

The term "gas station" is mostly used in the US, Canada and the English-speaking Caribbean, where the fuel is known as "gasoline" or "gas" as in "gas pump." People go there to get gas for their cars, trucks and other vehicles. In some regions of Canada, the term "gas bar" is used. Elsewhere in the English speaking world, mainly in the Commonwealth, the fuel is known as "petrol", and the term "petrol station" or "petrol pump" is used. In the United Kingdom and South Africa "garage" is still commonly used. Similarly, in Australia, the term "service station" ("servo") describes any petrol station. In Japanese English, it is called a "gasoline stand". In Indian English, it is called a petrol pump or a petrol bunk. In some regions of America and Australia, many filling stations have a mechanic on duty, but this is uncommon in other parts of the world.

About Gas Stations

A filling station, fueling station, garage, gasbar (Canada), gas station (United States and Canada), petrol bunk or petrol pump (India), petrol garage, petrol kiosk (Singapore), petrol station (United Kingdom, Ireland, Malaysia and Hong Kong), service station, or servo (Australia), is a facility which sells fuel and usually lubricants for motor vehicles. The most common fuels sold today are gasoline (gasoline or gas in the U.S. and Canada, typically petrol elsewhere), diesel fuel, and electric energy. Filling stations that sell only electric energy are also known as charging stations. Fuel dispensers are used to pump petrol/gasoline, diesel, CNG, CGH2, HCNG, LPG, LH2, ethanol fuel, biofuels like biodiesel, kerosene, or other types of fuel into vehicles and calculate the financial cost of the fuel transferred to the vehicle. Fuel dispensers are also known as bowsers (in some parts of Australia), petrol pumps (in most Commonwealth countries) or gas pumps (in North America).

Contributions by Coolcaesar, WhisperToMe, and Baldwin.jim.