High-fructose corn syrup

High-fructose corn syrup

About High-fructose corn syrup

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) also called glucose-fructose syrup in the UK, glucose/fructose in Canada, Glucose-Fructose syrup in the EU and high-fructose maize syrup in other countries comprises any of a group of corn syrups that has undergone enzymatic processing to convert some of its glucose into fructose to produce a desired sweetness. In the United States, consumer foods and products typically use high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener. It has become very common in processed foods and beverages in the U.S., including breads, cereals, breakfast bars, lunch meats, yogurts, soups, and condiments. According to the USDA, HFCS consists of 24% water, and the rest sugars.

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