High-Speed Rail

High-Speed Rail

About High-Speed Rail

High-speed rail (HSR) is a type of passenger rail transport that operates significantly faster than the normal speed of rail traffic. Specific definitions by the European Union include 200 km/h (124 mph) for upgraded track and 250 km/h (155 mph) or faster for new track, whilst in the United States, the U.S. Department of Transportation's reasonably expected to reach sustained speeds of more than 125 mph (201 km/h), although the Federal Railroad Administration uses a definition of above 110 mph (177 km/h). In Japan, Shinkansen lines run at speeds of up to 300 km/h (186 mph) and are built using standard gauge track with no at-grade crossings. China high-speed conventional rail lines currently holds the world's fastest commercial top speed of 350 km/h (217 mph), and the Shanghai Maglev Train holds the world's fastest Maglev commercial top speed of 431 km/h (268 mph). The world record for conventional high-speed rail is held by the V150, a specially configured and heavily modified version of Alstom's TGV which clocked 574.8 km/h (357.2 mph) on a test run. The world speed record for Maglev is held by the Japanese experimental MLX01: 581 km/h (361 mph). While high-speed rail is usually

Contributions by Armando, 204.48.134.17, and Patrick.