Holograms

Holograms

About Holograms

Holography (from the Greek los holos, whole + grafh grafe, writing, drawing) is a technique that allows the light scattered from an object to be recorded and later reconstructed so that when an imaging system (a camera or an eye) is placed in the reconstructed beam, an image of the object will be seen even when the object is no longer present. The image changes as the position and orientation of the viewing system changes in exactly the same way as if the object were still present, thus making the image appear three-dimensional. The holographic recording itself is not an image; it consists of an apparently random structure of either varying intensity, density or profile. The Hungarian-British physicist Dennis Gabor (Hungarian name: Gabor Denes), was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1971 for his invention and development of the holographic method. His work, done in the late 1940s, built on pioneering work in the field of X-ray microscopy by other scientists including Mieczyslaw Wolfke in 1920 and WL Bragg in 1939. The discovery was an unexpected result of research into improving electron microscopes at the British Thomson-Houston Company in Rugby, England, and the

Contributions by 203.123.74.122, DrBob, and Danh.