Houma People

Houma People

About Houma People

The Houma people are a Native America tribe. They belong to the United Houma Nation, a state recognized tribe in Louisiana. They primarily live in East and West Feliciana, and Pointe Coupee Parishes, about 100 miles (160_km) north of the town of Houma named for them, west of the mouth of the Mississippi River. The Houma tribe, thought to be Muskogean speaking like other Choctaw tribes, was recorded living along the Red River on the east side of Mississippi River, by the French explorer La Salle in 1682. Because their war emblem is the saktce-ho_ma, or Red Crawfish, anthropologist John R. Swanton has speculated that the Houma are an offshoot of the Yazoo River region_s Chakchiuma tribe, whose name is a corruption of saktce-ho_ma. Individuals in the tribe maintained contact with other Choctaw communities after settling in lower Lafourche-Terrebonne. It is not certain exactly how the Houma came to settle near the mouth of the Red River, formerly called the River of the Houma.

Contributions by Liberatus, Uyvsdi, and Parkwells.