Injunction

Injunction

About Injunction

An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that requires a party to do or refrain from doing specific acts. A party that fails to comply with an injunction faces criminal or civil penalties and may have to pay damages or accept sanctions. In some cases, breaches of injunctions are considered serious criminal offenses that merit arrest and possible prison sentences. The term interdict is used in Scots law. This injunctive power to restore the status quo ante; that is, to make whole again someone whose rights have been violated, is essential to the concept of fairness (equity). For example, money damages would be of scant benefit to a land owner who wished simply to prevent someone from repeatedly trespassing on his land. These are some common reasons for injunctions: A gag order is an order by a court or government restricting information or comment from being made public. A temporary restraining order (TRO) may be issued for short term.

Contributions by Bbb23, 24.215.179.42, and Altermike.