Iron

Iron

Iron is the most common chemical element by mass, with the symbol Fe and an atomic number of 26. It is present in the Earth's outer core, inner core, and crust. This chemical is also abundant in other rocky planets due to abundant production that comes about through fusion of high mass stars. Iron metal has been used since ancient times, though copper alloys, which have lower melting temperatures. Iron plays an important role in biology, forming complexes with molecular oxygen in hemoglobin and myoglobin; these two compounds are common oxygen transport proteins in vertebrates. Iron is also the metal used at the active site of many important redox enzymes dealing with cellular respiration and oxidation and reduction in plants and animals.

About Iron

Iron is a chemical element with the symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is the most common element (by mass) forming the planet Earth as a whole, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Iron's very common presence in rocky planets like Earth is due to its abundant production as a result of fusion in high-mass stars, where the production of nickel-56 (which decays to the most common isotope of iron) is the last nuclear fusion reaction that is exothermic.

Contributions by Dwmyers, Femto, and Josh Parris.