Jutes

Jutes

About Jutes

The Jutes, Iuti, or Iutae were a Germanic people who, according to Bede, were one of the three most powerful Germanic peoples of their time, the other two being the Saxons and the Angles. They are believed to have originated from Jutland peninsula (called Iutum in Latin) in modern Denmark, Southern Schleswig (Southern Jutland) and part of the East Frisian coast in northern Germany. Bede places the homeland of the Jutes on the other side of the Angles relative to the Saxons, which would mean the northern part of the Jutland Peninsula. Tacitus portrays a people called the Eudoses living in the north of Jutland and these may have been the later Iutae. The Jutes have also been identified with the Eotenas (eotenas) involved in the Frisian conflict with the Danes as described in the Finnesburg episode in the poem Beowulf (lines 1068-1159). Others have interpreted the eotenas as jotuns ("ettins" in English), meaning giants, or as a kenning for "enemies".

Contributions by Srnec, Wiglaf, and 202.72.158.206.