Lou Gehrig

Lou Gehrig

Lou Gehrig will always be known as "the luckiest man on the face of the earth". Gehrig spoke the now famous, echoing words at a celebration of his retirement due to a fatal illness. In June 1939, after a noticeable loss of strength while playing, Gehrig had himself tested at the Mayo Clinic. On June 19, his 36th birthday, he was diagnosed with ALS and less than 3 years to live. The disease would be commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease. Gehrig was a 7x all-star with the Yankees, 2x AL MVP, won 6 World Series and the 1934 Triple Crown. Gehrig died on June 2, 1941. He was 37.

About Lou Gehrig

Henry Louis 'Lou' or 'Buster' Gehrig (June 19, 1903 June 2, 1941) was an American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (-). Gehrig set several major league records, including the most career grand slams (23), which Alex Rodriguez tied in 2012, and most consecutive games played (2,130), since surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr.. Gehrig is chiefly remembered for his prowess as a hitter and his durability, a trait which earned him his nickname 'The Iron Horse', as well as the pathos of his farewell from baseball at age 36, when he was stricken with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Gehrig, who was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939, was voted the greatest first baseman of all time by the Baseball Writers' Association in 1969, and was the leading vote-getter on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team chosen by fans in 1999.

Contributions by 207.200.116.11, MisfitToys, and Gareth Owen.