Lymphogranuloma venereum

Lymphogranuloma venereum

About Lymphogranuloma venereum

Lymphogranuloma venereum (also known as 'Climatic bubo,' 'Durand-Nicolas-Favre disease,' 'Poradenitis inguinale,' and 'Strumous bubo') is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the invasive serovars L1, L2, L2a or L3 of Chlamydia trachomatis. LGV is primarily an infection of lymphatics and lymph nodes. Chlamydia trachomatis is the bacterium responsible for LGV. It gains entrance through breaks in the skin, or it can cross the epithelial cell layer of mucous membranes. The organism travels from the site of inoculation down the lymphatic channels to multiply within mononuclear phagocytes of the lymph nodes it passes. In developed nations, it was considered rare before 2003. However, a recent outbreak in the Netherlands among gay men has led to an increase of LGV in Europe and the United States. A majority of these patients are HIV co-infected. LGV was first described by Wallace in 1833 and again by Durand, Nicolas, and Favre in 1913.

Contributions by Arcadian, Daria k, and Karada.