Operant Conditioning

Operant Conditioning

About Operant Conditioning

Operant conditioning (or instrumental conditioning) is a form of learning in which an individual's behavior is modified by its consequences; the behavior may change in form, frequency, or strength. Operant conditioning is a term that was coined by B.F Skinner in 1937 Operant conditioning is distinguished from classical conditioning (or respondent conditioning) in that operant conditioning deals with the modification of 'voluntary behavior' or operant behavior. Operant behavior operates on the environment and is maintained by its consequences, while classical conditioning deals with the conditioning of reflexive (reflex) behaviors which are elicited by antecedent conditions. Behaviors conditioned via a classical conditioning procedure are not maintained by consequences. Reinforcement and punishment, the core tools of operant conditioning, are either positive (delivered following a response), or negative (withdrawn following a response).

Contributions by Lunar Spectrum, 66.69.221.24, and Kpmiyapuram.

New Questions for Operant Conditioning

See All Questions