Pelvis

Pelvis

About Pelvis

The pelvis, or pelvic bone, derived from the Latin word for 'basin', is an anatomical structure found in most vertebrates. It is the name given to both a bony structure or pelvic girdle connecting the base of the spine to the rear limbs, and the region of the body defined by that structure. The muscles and tissue beneath the pelvic girdle are known as the pelvic floor. The rounded epiphysis of the femur called the Head articulates with the pelvic bone at the Hip Joint at the acetabulum. The pelvic girdle is also known as the pelvis skeleton or bony pelvis. It is a large, bilaterally symmetric, compound bone structure, consisting of the os coxa, sacrum and coccyx. The top or forward part of the pelvis is called the pelvic inlet, and its edge the pelvic brim. A related skeletal structure, found mainly in birds and dinosaurs, is the synsacrum. In mammals, the pelvic girdle has a gap in the middle, significantly larger in females than in males.

Contributions by Sj, Nono64, and ClueBot NG.