Phi Sigma Kappa

Phi Sigma Kappa

About Phi Sigma Kappa

Phi Sigma Kappa (K), colloquially known as Phi Sig, is a general fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the Promotion of Brotherhood, the Stimulation of Scholarship, and the Development of Character. It was founded on March 15, 1873 at Massachusetts Agricultural College in Amherst (now the University of Massachusetts Amherst). Phi Sigma Kappa merged with Phi Sigma Epsilon in 1985. Massachusetts Agricultural College in Amherst, now the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is the setting for the founding of Phi Sigma Kappa. Among its other students in the early 1870s, it had attracted six men of varied backgrounds, ages, abilities, and goals in life who saw the need for a new and different kind of society on campus. It is then recalled that Henry Hague suggested that, since the six were close and were not interested in the fraternities on campus, they create their own. They banded together in 1873 to form a 'society to promote morality, learning and social culture.'

Contributions by Corsulian, Mcsteven, and Kennybenz.