Ralph Peer

Ralph Peer

About Ralph Peer

Ralph Sylvester Peer (May 22, 1892--January 19, 1960) was an American talent scout, recording engineer and record producer in the field of music in the 1920s and 1930s. Peer pioneered remote recording of music when in June 1923 he took remote recording equipment south to Atlanta, Georgia to record regional music outside the recording studio in such places as hotel rooms, ballrooms, or empty warehouses. Peer, born in Independence, Missouri, spent some years working for Columbia Records, in Kansas City, Missouri until 1920 when he was hired as recording director of General Phonograph's OKeh Records label in New York. In the same year he supervised the recording of Mamie Smith's 'Crazy Blues', reputed to be the first blues recording specifically aimed at the African-American market. In 1924 he supervised the first commercial recording session in New Orleans, Louisiana, recording jazz, blues, and gospel music groups there.

Contributions by Tiles, Mattisse, and Infrogmation.