Remicade

Remicade

About Remicade

Infliximab (INN; trade name Remicade) is a monoclonal antibody against tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-) used to treat autoimmune diseases. Remicade is marketed by Janssen Biotech, Inc. (formerly Centocor Biotech, Inc.) in the USA, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma in Japan, Xian Janssen in China, and Schering-Plough (now part of Merck & Co) elsewhere. Infliximab was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of psoriasis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. Infliximab won its initial approval by the FDA for the treatment of Crohn's disease in August 1998. Infliximab works by binding to tumour necrosis factor alpha. TNF- is a chemical messenger (cytokine) and a key part of the autoimmune reaction. Originally, the action of infliximab (in rheumatoid arthritis) was assumed to work by blocking the action of TNF- by preventing it from binding to its receptor in the cell.

Contributions by Jfdwolff, 216.241.37.2, and Nbauman.