Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah

About Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew), (literally head of the year), is the Jewish New Year. It is the first of the High Holy Days or Yamim Nora'im(Days of Awe) which occur in the autumn. Rosh Hashanah is celebrated on the firsttwo days of Tishrei. It is described in the Torah as (Yom Teru'ah, a day of sounding [the Shofar]). Rosh Hashanah customs include sounding the shofar and eating symbolic foods such as apples dipped in honey. Theterm Rosh Hashanah does not appear in the Torah. Leviticus 23:24 refers to the festival of the first day of the seventh month as Zikhron Teru'ah (a memorial with the blowing of horns), it is also referred to the same part of Leviticus or penultimate Sabbath or meditative rest day, and a holy day to God. These same words are commonly used in the Psalms to refer to the anointed days. Numbers 29:1 calls the festival Yom Teru'ah, (Day [of] blowing [the horn]) and symbolizes a number of subjects, such as the Binding of Isaac and the animal sacrifices that were to be performed. (The term Rosh Hashanah appears once in the Bible in Ezekiel 40:1 where it means generally the time of the beginning of the year.

Contributions by Noahlaws, Eliyak, and Jfdwolff.