Sinclair Lewis

Sinclair Lewis

About Sinclair Lewis

Harry Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885--January 10, 1951) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. In 1930, he became the first writer from the United States to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, 'for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters.' His works are known for their insightful and critical views of American society and capitalist values, as well as for their strong characterizations of modern working women. He has been honored by the U.S. Postal Service with a Great Americans series postage stamp. Born in the village of Sauk Centre, Minnesota, Lewis began reading books at a young age and kept a diary. He had two siblings, Fred (born 1875) and Claude (born 1878). His father, Edwin J. Lewis, was a physician and a stern disciplinarian who had difficulty relating to his sensitive, unathletic third son. Lewis's mother, Emma Kermott Lewis, died in 1891.

Contributions by Tedickey, Ministerpumpkin, and Modernist.