Solid State Drives (SSD)

Solid State Drives (SSD)

About Solid State Drives (SSD)

A solid-state drive (SSD), sometimes called a solid-state disk or electronic disk, is a data storage device that uses integrated circuit assemblies as memory to store data persistently. SSD technology uses electronic interfaces compatible with traditional block input/output (I/O) hard disk drives. SSDs do not employ any moving mechanical components, which distinguishes them from traditional magnetic disks such as hard disk drives (HDDs) or floppy disks, which are electromechanical devices containing spinning disks and movable read/write heads. Compared with electromechanical disks, SSDs are typically less susceptible to physical shock, are silent, and have lower access time and latency, but are, at 2011 market prices, more expensive per unit of storage. SSDs share the I/O interface technology developed for hard disk drives, thus permitting simple replacement for most applications. As of 2010, most SSDs use NAND-based flash memory, which retains data without power.

Contributions by Rochellesinger, GregorB, and SmackBot.