Synesthesia

Synesthesia

About Synesthesia

Synesthesia (also spelled synaesthesia or synaesthesia, plural synesthesiae or synaesthesiae), from the ancient Greek syn (syn), "together," and a_s8hsis (aisthesis), "sensation," is a neurological condition in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. People who report such experiences are known as synesthetes. Recently, difficulties have been recognized in finding an adequate definition of synesthesia, as many different phenomena have been covered by this term and in many cases the term synesthesia ("union of senses") seems to be a misnomer. A more accurate term for the phenomenon may be ideasthesia. In one common form of synesthesia, known as grapheme _ color synesthesia or color-graphemic synesthesia, letters or numbers are perceived as inherently colored, while in ordinal linguistic personification, numbers, days of the week and months of the year evoke personalities.

Contributions by 82.41.8.29, Solipsist, and 81.17.198.133.