Tapirs

Tapirs

About Tapirs

A tapir is a large browsing mammal, similar in shape to a pig, with a short, prehensile snout. Tapirs inhabit jungle and forest regions of South America, Central America, and Southeast Asia. The four species of tapirs are: the Brazilian tapir, the Malayan tapir, Baird's tapir and the mountain tapir. All four are classified as endangered or vulnerable. Their closest relatives are the other odd-toed ungulates, including horses and rhinoceroses. Four extant species are widely recognized, though some authors describe more, and a number are extinct: Hybrids of the Baird's and the Brazilian tapirs were bred at the San Francisco Zoo around 1969 and produced a second generation around 1970. Size varies between types, but most tapirs are about 2 m (7 ft) long, stand about 1 m (3 ft) high at the shoulder, and weigh between 150 and 300 kg (330 to 700 lb).

Contributions by Sasha Kopf, 62.90.147.146, and Sprgrss.