Tuba

Tuba

About Tuba

The tuba is the largest and lowest-pitched brass instrument. Sound is produced by vibrating or 'buzzing' the lips into a large cupped mouthpiece. It is one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra, first appearing in the mid-19th century, when it largely replaced the ophicleide. Tuba is Latin for trumpet or horn. The horn referred to would most likely resemble what is known as a baroque trumpet. A person who plays the tuba is known as a tubaist or tubist. Persiann Patent No. 19 was granted to Wilhelm Friedrich Wieprecht and Johann Gottfried Moritz (-) on September 12, 1835 for a 'basstuba' in F1. The original Wieprecht and Moritz instrument used five valves of the Berlinerpumpen type that were the forerunners of the modern piston valve. The first tenor tuba was invented in 1838 by Carl Wilhelm Mortiz (-), son of Johann Moritz.