Twelfth Amendment

Twelfth Amendment

About Twelfth Amendment

The Twelfth Amendment (Amendment XII) to the United States Constitution provides the procedure for electing the President and Vice President. It replaced Article II, Section 1, Clause 3, which provided the original procedure by which the Electoral College functioned. Problems with the original procedure arose in the elections of 1796 and 1800. The Twelfth Amendment was proposed by the Congress on December 9, 1803, and was ratified by the required number of state legislatures on June 15, 1804. Under the original procedure for the Electoral College, as provided in Article II, Section 1, Clause 3, each elector could cast two votes. Each elector could not vote for two people inhabiting the same state as that elector. This prohibition was designed to keep electors from voting for two 'favorite sons' of their respective states. The person receiving the greatest number of votes, provided that number equalled a majority of the electors, was elected President.

Contributions by Lord Emsworth, 68.225.18.68, and 168.212.165.131.