Typhoid fever

Typhoid fever

About Typhoid fever

Typhoid fever, also known as typhoid, is a common worldwide bacterial disease, transmitted by the ingestion of food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person, which contain the bacterium Salmonella typhi, serotype Typhi. The disease has received various names, such as gastric fever, abdominal typhus, infantile remittant fever, slow fever, nervous fever or pythogenic fever. The name 'typhoid' means 'resembling typhus' and comes from the neuropsychiatric symptoms common to typhoid and typhus. Despite this similarity of their names, typhoid fever and typhus are distinct diseases and are caused by different species of bacteria. The impact of this disease fell sharply with the application of 20th century sanitation techniques. Classically, the course of untreated typhoid fever is divided into four individual stages, each lasting approximately one week.

Contributions by Alex LaPointe, Caracaskid, and MarcoTolo.