Utraquism

Utraquism

About Utraquism

Utraquism was the principal dogma, and one of the four articles, of the Calixtines or Hussites who maintained that both the bread and the wine should be administered to the people during the Eucharist. Utraquism was a Christian dogma first proposed by Jacob of Mies, professor of philosophy at the University of Prague, in 1414. It maintained that the Eucharist should be administered 'in both kinds' as both bread and wine to all the congregation, including the laity. (The practice among Roman Catholics at the time was for only the priests to partake of the wine.) The Utraquists were a moderate faction of the Hussites (in contrast to the more radical Taborites, Orebites and Orphans). They were also known as the Prague Party or the Calixtines from calix, Latin for their emblem, the chalice.

Contributions by British, Varlaam, and Rshu.