Wallabies

Wallabies

About Wallabies

A wallaby is any of about thirty species of Macropodidae family. It is an informal designation generally used for any macropod that is smaller than a kangaroo or wallaroo that has not been given some other name. Forest-dwelling wallabies are known as 'pademelons' (genus Thylogale) and 'dorcopsises' (genera Dorcopsis and Dorcopsulus). The name 'wallaby' comes from the Eora, who were the first human inhabitants of the Sydney area. Young wallabies are known as 'joeys', like many other marsupials. Adult male wallabies are referred to as 'bucks', 'boomers', or 'jacks'. An adult female wallaby is known as a 'doe', 'flyer', or 'jill'. A group of wallabies is called a 'court', 'mob', or 'troup'. Although members of most wallaby species are small, some can grow up to six feet in length (from head to tail). Wallabies are herbivores whose diet consists of a wide range of grasses, vegetables, leaves, and other foliage.